[Book Cover]

Portfolio Learning, 1/e

Barbara L. Cambridge, Indiana University
Anne C. Williams, Indiana University

Published October, 1997 by Prentice Hall Humanities/Social Science

Copyright 1998, 372 pp.
Paper
ISBN 0-13-299819-X


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Summary

This unique book demonstrates how portfolio classrooms foster learning as students write, revise, assess, and present themselves as thinkers and writers in their portfolios through the narrative of one student's engaging journey to portfolio completion. Within that context, the book presents a wide variety of writing activities, flexible assignments, and opportunities for student self-assessment and collaboration.
Based on a foundation of portfolio learning where the instructor functions as the students' “guide by their side,” the book shows the link between learning and assessment.
Presents a complete narrative of one student's progress through the course as a device for delivering the material and illustrating how students can learn from students.
Offers concrete strategies for substantive revision by embedding thinking strategies such as clustering and freewriting throughout the writing process rather than limiting students to prewriting activities.
Provides multiple student examples throughout — including metawriting and revisions — especially evident in sample Portfolio Letters and Justin's Portfolio.
Includes a large number of exercises and activities to promote collaboration and analysis for students' own work.

Features


Based on a foundation of portfolio learning where the instructor functions as the students' “guide by their side,” the book shows the link between learning and assessment.
Presents a complete narrative of one student's progress through the course as a device for delivering the material and illustrating how students can learn from students.
Offers concrete strategies for substantive revision by embedding thinking strategies such as clustering and freewriting throughout the writing process rather than limiting students to prewriting activities.
Provides multiple student examples throughout — including metawriting and revisions — especially evident in sample Portfolio Letters and Justin's Portfolio.
Includes a large number of exercises and activities to promote collaboration and analysis for students' own work.


Table of Contents

    1. Exploring Your Role as a Portfolio Learner and Writer.

      Identifying Multiple Roles. Recognizing Influences on Your Role as a Composition Student. Keeping a Dialogue Journal. Defining Your Goals for This Course. Using Dialogue Journal Entries as Background for Writing a Paper. Preparing to Tell Your Literacy Story.

    2. Writing a Draft.

      Determining Purpose. Determining Audience. Using Proposals to Focus Your Ideas. Writing a Proposal for Your Literacy Autobiography. Using Writer's Statements to Communicate with Readers. Preparing a Writer's Statement.

    3. Narrowing the Lens.

      Using Questions and Responses to Assess Focus. Freewriting to Focus and Develop Ideas. Looping to Generate Ideas. Clustering to Visualize Ideas.

    4. Responding to Writing.

      Responding to Your Own Work. Responding to the Process and Products of Other Writers. Responding in Groups to One Another's Work. Responding to the Comments of Other Readers.

    5. Learning Across Drafts.

      Beginning with One Assignment. Summarizing and Analyzing a Reading. Using Journalistic Questions. Developing a Paper That Responds to Reading. Turning to the Next Assignment. Developing a Paper That Uses Observation as an Information Source. Returning to a Preceding Assignment. Rethinking a Draft.

    6. Creating Variety.

      Using Interviews as Information Sources. Proposing a Paper that Synthesizes Text and Interviews. Interviewing for Information to Use in Revision. Conducting Formal Interviews.

    7. Drawing from Different Media.

      Synthesizing Sources. Developing an Essay Using Various Media as Sources.

    8. Conducting an Investigation.

      Beginning an Investigation. Working with Sources. Writing a Proposal for a Paper Using Research. Drafting a Paper Incorporating Research. Incorporating Sources into Your Writing.

    9. Making Choices.

      Selecting Work to Revise for the Course Portfolio. Finding Cues About What to Revise. Turning to Reader Responses. Choosing to Revise as a Demonstration of Learning.

    10. Revision: Taking Another Look at Purpose and Focus.

      Identifying Issues for Revision. Summarizing Response for Revision Analysis. Taking a Second Look: Fulfilling Purpose. Taking a Second Look: Narrowing Focus. Revising to Narrow Focus.

    11. Revision: Taking a Second Look at Organization and Development.

      Taking a Second Look at Organization. Reorganizing a Paper. Taking a Second Look at Development.. Creating a Development Package. Revising to Develop Main Points. A Final Look at Revision.

    12. Editing Your Portfolio Papers.

      Looking for Patterns of Error. Being Alert to Writing Conventions. Working on Editing Tasks. Identifying Random Errors. Your Turn to Edit.

    13. Completing Your Course Portfolio.

      Documenting Your Learning in This Course. Evaluating Your Work. Presenting Your Work. Preparing Your Portfolio Introduction. Portions of Portfolio Letters. Completing Your Course Portfolio.

    Justin's Course Portfolio.


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