[Book Cover]

Soils Properties: Testing, Measurement, and Evaluation, 4/e

Cheng Liu
Jack B. Evett, both of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Published July, 1999 by Prentice Hall Career & Technology

Copyright 2000, 420 pp.
Paper Bound with Disk
ISBN 0-13-020069-7

[CD Included]


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Summary

For sophomore/senior-level courses in Geotechnical Engineering or Soils and Foundation Engineering offered in Construction or Civil Engineering departments. This unique lab manual guides students step-by-step through the hows and whys of the most commonly used testing methods in civil engineering practice—those based on the latest American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) procedures. The manual uses a consistent “Procedure,” “Data,” and “Calculations” format for each test; contains completely worked examples showing the computations required for the analysis and evaluation of the test data collected; discusses what data, results, and other information should be presented in the test report; and explains what the test results will be used for in practical engineering problems. Blank data reporting forms and graph papers are provided for most tests, and an accompanying diskette contains state-of-the-art, user-friendly software for compiling test data, performing calculations, plotting curves, and obtaining final results.

Features


NEW—Up-to-date testing procedures from the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM).

  • Familiarizes students with the standards that practicing engineers and architects almost always cite in contracts and specifications, preparing them for the realities of the workplace.
NEW—A chapter on Determining the Density and Unit Weight of Soil in Place by Nuclear Methods. (Ch. 15)
  • Introduces students to a method that is widely used by practitioners in field testing because of its relative simplicity and speed.
NEW—15% new/revised problems.
  • Allows instructors and students to work with fresh material.
Simple, direct writing style.
  • Makes complex material easy to read and understand.
Definition, scope, and objective for each experiment.
  • Gives students an initial understanding of what they are attempting to do and for what purpose. A “Procedures,” “Data,” “Calculations” sequence for each test.
  • A general overview of the entire procedure of each test gives students an overall preview of the entire process of testing prior to tackling the sometimes laborious step-by-step procedure; a list of data shows students exactly what must be collected during the performance of the test; and step-by-step calculations show students precisely how the collected data are evaluated to obtain the desired test results.
One (or more) completely worked numerical examples for each test—Shows step by step the computations required for the analysis and evaluation of the test data collected. Includes charts and graphs, if needed.
  • Gives students a completely worked example to study prior to and after performing the test, so they will know better what is to be done and how.
Clear differentiation between “measured” and “computed” data in numerical examples—Highlights (in boldface type) all data collected during a test. All other values (primarily computed values) are presented in regular type.
  • More easily identifies actual collected data.
“Typical values” for various tests (when available).
  • Helps students determine if their test results are reasonable.
“Method of presentation” and “engineering uses of the test results”—Given for each test.
  • Helps beginning students better understand what data, results, and other information should be presented in the test report, and what the test results will be used for in practical engineering problems.
Data reporting forms and graph papers for most tests—Provides blank copies of all forms at the end of each chapter; blank copies of graph papers at the end of the text. The graph paper for each experiment can be photocopied as needed.
  • Provides students with a convenient means of recording test data, carrying out required computations, and plotting required curves, as well as displaying the test results.
State-of-the-art, user-friendly software—Provided on an accompanying diskette.
  • Allows students to compile test data, perform calculations, plot curves, and obtain final results with efficiency and accuracy. @CANADABRK =


Table of Contents
    1. Introduction.
    2. Description and Identification of Soils (Visual-Manual Procedure).
    3. Determining the Moisture Content of Soil (Conventional Oven Method).
    4. Determining the Moisture Content of Soil (Microwave Oven Method).
    5. Determining the Specific Gravity of Soil.
    6. Determining the Liquid Limit of Soil.
    7. Determining the Plastic Limit and Plasticity Index of Soil.
    8. Determining the Shrinkage Limit of Soil.
    9. Grain-Size Analysis of Soil (Including Both Mechanical and Hydrometer Analyses).
    10. Classification of Soils for Engineering Purposes.
    11. Determining Moisture-Unit Weight Relations of Soil (Compaction Test).
    12. Determining the Moisture Content of Soil (By Means of a Calcium Carbide Gas Moisture Tester).
    13. Determining the Density and Unit Weight of Soil in Place by the Sand-Cone Method.
    14. Determining the Density and Unit Weight of Soil in Place by the Rubber-Balloon Method.
    15. Determining the Density and Unit Weight of Soil in Place by Nuclear Methods.
    16. Percolation Test.
    17. Permeability Test for Granular Soils (Constant-Head Method).
    18. Permeability Test for Fine-Grained and Granular Soils (Falling-Head Method).
    19. Consolidation Test.
    20. Determining the Unconfined Compressive Strength of Cohesive Soil.
    21. Triaxial Compression Test.
    22. Direct Shear Test.
    23. California Bearing Ratio Test.
    Graph Papers.
    Disk Installation Tips.


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