[Book Cover]

Forest Ecology: A Foundation for Sustainable Management, 2/e

James P. Kimmins, University of British Columbia

Published August, 1996 by Prentice Hall Engineering/Science/Mathematics

Copyright 1997, 596 pp.
Cloth
ISBN 0-02-364071-5


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Summary

Forest Ecology uses an ecosystem approach to understanding the ecology of forests. It examines the form and function of forest ecosystems and how they change over time in response to natural and human-caused disturbances.

Features


A complete treatment of the ecosystem including all the major structural components and functional processes of the forest ecosystem.
Uses a systems or wholistic view of the forest ecosystem, rather than the more traditional reductionist and “building-block” view.
Gives equal emphasis to ecosystem function, the physical environment, the biotic processes (population and community ecology) and ecosystem change overtime.
Examines forest ecology in the context of sustainable development and population growth.
Richly illustrated with line drawings, graphs, tables and photographs which complement and amplify the text material.
NEWNew chapter on Environmental Issues (Ch. 19).
NEWEarlier introduction to the concept of ecosystem change (Ch. 3 instead of Ch. 15).
NEWStreamlined coverage of nutrient cycling.
NEW—Increased coverage of succession (Ch. 15), modeling (Ch. 17), biodiversity (Ch. 14) and plant population ecology (Ch. 13).
NEW —Chapter 4 now emphasizes production ecology, capturing the improved understanding of the determinants of ecosystem productivity gained over the past seven years.


Table of Contents
I. HUMANS AND THE FOREST OR WHY THE SCIENCE OF FOREST ECOLOGY DEVELOPED

    1. Sustainability of Forest Ecosystems: The Problem of Human Population Growth.
    2. Development of Forestry and Forest Ecology.

II. FOREST ECOLOGY: THE BIOLOGICAL BASIS FOR MANAGEMENT OF FOREST RESOURCES
Section A. Ecosystem Ecology: The Forest as a Functional System. 3. Ecology and the Ecosystem Concept.
    4. Production Ecology: The Transfer and Storage of Energy in Ecosystems.
    5. Biogeochemistry: Cycling of Nutrients in Ecosystems.
    Section B. Genetic and Evolutionary Aspects of Ecosystems.
    6. Adaption and Evolution: Genetic Aspects of Ecosystems.
    Section C. The Physical Environment.
    7. Ecological Role of Solar Radiation.
    8. Temperature as an Ecological Factor.
    9. Wind: Ecological Effects of Atmospheric Movements.
    10. Soil: The Least Renewable Physical Component of the Ecosystem.
    11. Water: The Material That Makes Life Possible.
    12. Fire: A Pervasive and Powerful Environmental Factor.
    Section D. The Biotic Environment.
    13. Population Ecology: Study of Abundance and Dynamics of Species Populations.
    14. Community Ecology.
    Section E. Temporal Changes in Ecosystem Structure and Function.
    15. Ecological Succession: Processes of Change in Ecosystems.
III. APPLICATION OF ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION IN THE MANAGEMENT OF FOREST ECOSYSTEMS
    16. Ecosystem Classification: The Ecological Foundation for Sustainable Forest Management.
    17. Models and Their Role in Ecology and Resource Management.
    18. Renewability of Natural Resources and Implications for Forest Management.
    19. Environmental Issues in Forestry: The Role of Ecology.
    Glossary.
    Appendixes.
    References Cited.
    Index.


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